This One Vitamin Could Save You From the Coronavirus ???

This One Vitamin Could Save You From the Coronavirus ???

A new study shows the vitamin K found in cheese and leafy greens can help stave off coronavirus.

By Alek Korab June 7, 2020 www.eatthis.com/coronavirus-vitamin-k/

As you fortify yourself against the coronavirus—wearing a mask, social distancing and keeping your immune system strong—there may be one vitamin you’re forgetting that might hold the key in keeping you safe from COVID-19: Vitamin K. New findings may show “a link between deficiency and the worst coronavirus outcomes,” according to the Guardian.

Why the Vitamin May Be Key

“COVID-19 causes blood clotting and leads to the degradation of elastic fibers in the lungs,” explains the paper about the findings. “Vitamin K, which is ingested through food and absorbed in the gastrointestinal tract, is key to the production of proteins that regulate clotting and can protect against lung disease.” 

Since COVID-19 is a respiratory disease, this protection could be key in adding another level of protection. The research, headed up by Dr. Rob Janssen, was done in partnership with the Cardiovascular Research Institute Maastricht, a heart and vascular research institute in Europe. Over the course of a month, they studied 134 patients and found many who had died or been admitted to the ICU lacked the vitamin.

“My advice would be to take those vitamin K supplement,” Dr. Janssen told the Guardian. “Even if it does not help against severe Covid-19, it is good for your blood vessels, bones and probably also for the lungs. We are in a terrible, horrible situation in the world. We do have an intervention which does not have any side effects, even less than a placebo. There is one major exception: people on anti-clotting medication. It is completely safe in other people.”

How to Get More Vitamin K

“We have [vitamin] K1 and K2. K1 is in spinach, broccoli, green vegetables, blueberries, all types of fruit and vegetables,” Janssen continued. “K2 is better absorbed by the body. It is in Dutch cheese, I have to say, and French cheese as well.”

The recommended daily value of vitamin K is 120 micrograms for adult males and 90 micrograms for adult females.

Vitamin K found in some cheeses could help fight Covid-19, study suggests

Scientists in Netherlands explore possible link between deficiency and Covid-19 deaths

Patients who have died or been admitted to intensive care with Covid-19 have been found to be deficient in a vitamin found in spinach, eggs, and hard and blue cheeses, raising hopes that dietary change might be one part of the answer to combating the disease.

Researchers studying patients who were admitted to the Canisius Wilhelmina hospital in the Dutch city of Nijmegen have extolled the benefits of vitamin K after discovering a link between deficiency and the worst coronavirus outcomes.

Covid-19 causes blood clotting and leads to the degradation of elastic fibres in the lungs. Vitamin K, which is ingested through food and absorbed in the gastrointestinal tract, is key to the production of proteins that regulate clotting and can protect against lung disease.

The Dutch researchers are now seeking funding for a clinical trial, but Dr Rob Janssen, a scientist working on the project, said that in light of the initial findings he would encourage a healthy intake of vitamin K, except to those on blood-thinning medications such as warfarin.

He said: “We are in a terrible, horrible situation in the world. We do have an intervention which does not have any side effects, even less than a placebo. There is one major exception: people on anti-clotting medication. It is completely safe in other people.

“My advice would be to take those vitamin K supplements. Even if it does not help against severe Covid-19, it is good for your blood vessels, bones and probably also for the lungs.”

Janssen added: “We have [vitamin] K1 and K2. K1 is in spinach, broccoli, green vegetables, blueberries, all types of fruit and vegetables. K2 is better absorbed by the body. It is in Dutch cheese, I have to say, and French cheese as well.”

A Japanese delicacy of fermented soya beans called natto is particularly high in the second type of vitamin K and there may be cause for further studies into its health benefits, Janssen said.

“I have worked with a Japanese scientist in London and she said it was remarkable that in the regions in Japan where they eat a lot of natto, there is not a single person to die of Covid-19; so that is something to dive into, I would say.”

The research, undertaken in partnership with the Cardiovascular Research Institute Maastricht, one of Europe’s largest heart and vascular research institutes, studied 134 patients hospitalised for Covid-19 between 12 March and 11 April, alongside a control group of 184 age-matched patients who did not have the disease.

Jona Walk, a second researcher on the study, which was submitted for peer review on Friday, said: “We want to take very sick Covid-19 patients and randomise so that they get a placebo or vitamin K, which is very safe to use in the general population. We want to give vitamin K in a significantly high enough dose that we really will activate [the protein] that is so important for protecting the lungs, and check if it is safe.”

“The best way to get the daily requirement of vitamin K is by eating food sources,” says MedLinePlus. “Vitamin K is found in the following foods:

  • Green leafy vegetables, such as kale, spinach, turnip greens, collards, Swiss chard, mustard greens, parsley, romaine, and green leaf lettuce
  • Vegetables such as Brussels sprouts, broccoli, cauliflower, and cabbage
  • Fish, liver, meat, eggs, and cereals (contain smaller amounts)”
  • For a list of the 20 Best Vitamin K-Rich Foods from Eat This, Not That!, click here!

The 20 Best Vitamin K-Rich Foods

The nutrient helps with bone health, blood sugar, and more.

If you want to check all of the boxes when it comes to health, specifically bone health and heart health, then you’ll want to pay attention to your daily vitamin K intake. Vitamin K is a fat-soluble vitamin, meaning you need to consume it with a fat source to absorb it. It’s found in a variety of foods, including kale, spinach, and more (see the full list below).

According to Melissa Groves, RDN, LD, CLT, and founder of Avocado Grove Nutrition & Wellness, foods rich in vitamin K are needed for a variety of important functions in your body. “Your body uses vitamin K to make proteins that are important for blood clotting, maintaining bone health, and preventing calcium deposits in soft tissues, such as your arteries, kidneys, and elsewhere,” Groves says.

In addition to helping your body function normally, vitamin K could be helpful for diabetes management. “It’s possible that vitamin K may help control blood sugar levels, which could be helpful for people with diabetes,” says Amy Gorin, MS, RDN, owner of Amy Gorin Nutrition in the New York City area. “However, if you have diabetes and are taking a vitamin K supplement, you should speak with your doctor, because your diabetes medication may need to be adjusted.”

The recommended daily value of vitamin K is 120 micrograms for adult males and 90 micrograms for adult females.

Here, you’ll find the top 20 foods rich in vitamin K, ranked from the lowest to the highest concentration of vitamin, with percent daily value references for adult women over 19 years old. With these ideas, you’ll never run out of ways to make sure you’re getting enough of the nutrient in your daily diet. 20

Ground Beef

One pot ground beef taco skillet
Shutterstock

Vitamin K Content: Per 3 oz.: 2 micrograms (2.2% DV)

Who doesn’t love a good burger? Besides being high in B vitamins and protein, ground beef is also a source of a vitamin K. Because vitamin K is a fat-soluble vitamin, beef has you covered, because it also contains fat. Plus, ground beef’s combination of fat and protein will keep you full for hours. That sounds like a win.

RELATED: Learn how to fire up your metabolism and lose weight the smart way. 19

Grapes

Grapes
Shutterstock

Vitamin K Content: Per ½ cup: 6.7 micrograms (7.4% DV)

Grapes are a great choice when you’re looking for a sweet and healthy snack that’s easy to eat on the go. Just ½ cup of grapes gets you 6.7 micrograms of vitamin K. Grapes also contain antioxidants called polyphenols. 18

Olive Oil

Olive oil
Roberta Sorge/Unsplash

Vitamin K Content: Per 1 tablespoon: 8.1 micrograms (9% DV)

You might use olive oil as a healthy fat for cooking and dressings, but did you know it also contains important vitamins? That’s right—just one tablespoon of olive oil contains 8.1 micrograms of vitamin K, a whopping 9 percent of the total recommended daily value. Olive oil also contains vitamin E and is a great source of healthy fat. You can drizzle it on veggies, salads, or other dishes for extra flavor. 17

Raw Carrots

Carrots
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Vitamin K Content: Per 1 medium carrot: 8.1 micrograms (9% DV)

Raw carrots are a great source of vitamin A, the vitamin known to support eye health and so much more. They also contain a decent amount of vitamin K. Try chopping carrots into sticks for a snack that’s great with dips like hummus or guacamole. (This is a good idea because combining vitamin A with a source of fat is ideal.) Or you can try shredding carrots and adding them to salads for some crunch and color. 16

Cashews

Cashews
Shutterstock

Vitamin K Content: Per 28.35 grams, raw: 9.7 micrograms (10.7% DV)

If you’re tired of almonds, why not change things up? Enjoy some cashews next time you’re craving a salty snack and want to make sure you’re getting enough vitamin K. Cashews, which are also a great source of potassium, pack more than 10 percent of the recommended daily value of vitamin K for adult women. 15

Canned Vegetable Juice Cocktail

Shutterstock

Vitamin K Content: Per 6 fl oz: 11.6 micrograms (12.8% DV)

Vegetable juice cocktail is a great source of vitamins, including vitamin A, vitamin C, and vitamin K. You’ll get 11.6 micrograms closer to your total daily vitamin K intake with just one serving of juice. Enjoy veggie juice as a refreshing drink on its own, or blend it into your morning smoothie for extra nutrition. 14

Blueberries

Frozen blueberries
Shutterstock

Vitamin K Content: Per 50 berries: 13.1 micrograms (14.55% DV)

If you need another reminder about the health benefits of blueberries, you’re in luck. Blueberries are a great source of vitamin K. Plus, blueberries also contain fiber, vitamin C, and antioxidants, packing a big nutrition bang for your buck. 13

Iceberg Lettuce

Head of iceberg lettuce
Shutterstock

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